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  ISSN 1314-2143 (online)

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Relative share of asymptomatic forms of hepatitis a in Plovdiv region, Bulgaria

 

Nikolai T. Vatev1 / Mariyana V. Stoycheva2 / Andrey I. Petrov3 / Maria V. Atanasova4
1Department of Hygiene, Ecology and Epidemiology
2Department of Infectious Diseases, Parasitology and Tropical Medicine
3Department of Infectious Diseases, Parasitology and Tropical Medicine
4Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University, Plovdiv, Bulgaria
Correspondence and reprint request to: N. Vatev, Dept. of Hygiene, Ecology and Epidemiology, Medical University, PlovdivE-mail:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; Mob.: +359 889 257 51315A Vassil Aprilov St, 4002 Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Citation Information: Folia Medica. Volume 53, Issue 4, Pages 42–46, ISSN (Online) 1314-2143, ISSN (Print) 0204-8043, DOI: 10.2478/v10153-011-0066-x, October 2012
Publication History:
Published Online:
2012-10-24

 


ABSTRACT

 

OBJECTIVE: To study the relative share of asymptomatic forms of Hepatitis A in family reservoirs of infection with different hygienic conditions.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Asymptomatic forms were identifi ed by detecting anti-HAV IgM using ELISA. Two types of households: with poor hygiene and with good hygiene, were studied. The study was designed as case-control. A group of Hepatitis A contact children attending day nurseries and kindergartens was also included in the study.

RESULTS: The relative share of asymptomatic forms of HAV infection in poor hygiene households was 58.62%, while in those with good hygiene it was 41.57%. The comparison using Fisher’s exact test yielded OR = 1.99 and 95% CI (P < 0.05). Asymptomatic forms were found in 7.75% of the investigated contacts among children attending day nurseries and kindergartens.

CONCLUSION: Asymptomatic forms of hepatitis A are very common which makes them epidemiologically quite signifi cant as many of the cases remain unrecognized and later become focal points of new cases of the disease. Poor hygiene conditions are likely to cause more asymptomatic forms. The high relative share of asymptomatic forms found in the households supports the need for immunoprophylaxis of the contacts.

Keywords: : hepatitis A; asymptomatic forms; source of infection